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20100901
20100930
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SFGTV2 57
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
who uses the oil and dive into safety by the middle of 2011. we are delighted to be able to use this opportunity. back in october, we had a ground-breaking ceremony for the project as a whole. we had the speaker of the house nancy pelosi with us. the mayor was here, other dignitaries. at the time, we were looking at the oil drive -- doyle drive. we now have a different project for the 21st century. it is an example of what partnership and inventiveness and the full participation of the amazing community of san francisco residents can do to create a project that is really worthy of the amazing natural setting of the presidio park, the largest urban park in the park system. let me start by making some acknowledgements. we have some speakers who i will introduced in a moment, but i am very pleased to welcome to the event, dan representing the speaker's office. i would also like to have very much thank christine from senator feinstein's office, as well as mega miller, a field representative team for senator boxer. in that knowledge and then come i want to the knowledge and leadershi
that involves talking to us, and more important, listening to us, hearing our voices. so many have worked so hard, has you have been told -- as you have been told, to bring the state to pass. and now we have a dazzling new setting to present to you. when you leave today, you will be going home. but laguna honda residents will not be leaving. this is our home. and it is very important to us. we are already here. but please come back and visit us frequently. this wonderful new laguna honda would not exist without you. i just want to add a personal note. my younger sister, emily, was a resident here for many more years than i have been. she was greatly loved. we lost her recently. i would like to dedicate this speech to her and remembered her, as many of the residents do, with great fondness and affection. thank you all. [applause] >> i would like to invite you all nowi that good enough? this is a participatory ribbon cutting. it requires nothing more complicated than this. i will ask you to count down, not up. upon conclusion, we will applaud the great works of turner construction, the dedicat
wants, this man will find. tag along with us as we go on a produce pursuit in northern california. then, meet a farmer who is surrounded by his favorite things--his berries and his brothers. finally, think starting a vegetable garden is hard? our expert has advice to get you started and on your way to a homegrown meal in no time. it's all ahead, and it starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] >> so we all know that california is king when it comes to growing citrus. and when it comes to growing lemons, no one is bigger than this ventura county farm. and with over 7,000 acres of lush lemon trees, limoneira isn't just the biggest lemon grower in california, but in all of north america. based in santa paula, the farm is a testament to what hard work and determination can do. foundi fathers nathan blanchard and wallace hardison first bought the land way back in 1893 and named the ranch limoneira, which means "lemon lands" in portuguese. >> and at the time, they wanted to bring about the first full-scale commercial operation citrus ranch in the u.s. and fro
>> as you are thinking about that, i would like to ask you to give us one more. there are 2 completely surprising and interesting substories woven through this narrative of your brother, 1, your fabulous aunt character in mexico getting frosty into mexico and running around with frita caller and your discovery of apples? >> this is astonishing, are we talking about the family past apple? >> both and the way thing danagers come together, yeah. >> kind of astonishing, again working on the idea that everything is passed down in families is it or is it not or is it coincidence. my father had a difficult relationship with his father from mexico. we knew our family had this chain of nurseries from mexico. i never understood because my father would change tg subject when his name came up. our grandfather was an orchardist at the turn of the century. >> which you hadn't even known. >> i didn't know it until i discovered this at the archive when i was trying to page through all of these things. then i discovered an obituary that had been written about our grandfather when he died whe
. that brings us here today, her success, and that is how we have to address this to get the nation moving again. it is very exciting to work with speaker pelosi, senator boxer, senator feinstein on these huge projects. we have always believed california is on the cutting edge. being here in this great city with this great leadership is once again the proof that we are on the cutting edge. thank you for the vision of the transportation secretary as well for recognizing that. [applause] >> thank you. now it is with great pleasure that i introduce senator barbara boxer, who from the beginning, has worked on the transbay project. a forceful advocate for families, children, consumers, the environment, and state of california, barbara boxer became a u.s. senator in 1993 after 10 years of service in the house of representatives. elected to a third term in 2004, she received more than 6.9 million votes, the highest total for any senate candidate in history. a liter on environmental protection, she is the first woman to chair the u.s. senate's environmental and public works committee. she advocates forc
have become used to. what i am going to show you is a lost civilization. it's a strange place. and yet, it becomes oddly familiar after a while because we built it and use it every day without knowing it. it has been buried. the living new deal project is like an archaeological dig. we are going after the new deal in california, but hope to extend throughout the united states. i thought that i am, photographer robert dosson could photo. it's gradually become a collaborative prejudice, which is state wide and is being sponsored by the california historical society for research and labor employment at berkeley. this is part of the team. part of it is community involvement. we want people to become aware of what's around them. the records are terrible. he lives up nevada city. i told him what i was doing and he was consciencious. he had a stack of clippings about what the new deal had done in his area and walked around while he showed me sidewalks and parks and schools and gardens and camps that had been done. he said, i didn't notice. then he became mayor. it's exactly the kind of thing
bay area, california, and washington, d.c., who worked with us to make this happen. many are here today and others in spirit. thank you all. we made it. the grand central station of the west coast is starting construction. [applause] thank you. now, i would like to introduce our first speaker, the chairman of our board, nathaniel ford. he serves as the chair of the transbay joint powers authority and the executive director of the municipal transportation agency. he also sits on the caltrain board of directors. he has been a strong supporter of the project since its arrival, and we are deeply grateful for his leadership and guidance. chairman ford. [applause] >> thank you, maria. good morning, everyone. today is a great day, and we thank you for coming to our ceremony. i say our ceremony because it took all of us to pull this together, all of our hard work. those of you who contributed over the decade, a long effort to end at today culminating in a groundbreaking for our new transit center. there are many people that we should mention today and give a little bit of perspective in t
was 10 times stronger than the concrete that is used to support the building. >> okay, moving to another part of the city, this is the eastern side. >> this is on army street? >> yes, this is army st., se. look at all that stuff. it is an active city. >> a lot of the old industrial, the american can co., goodman lumber. all that good stuff. >> wow. >> and this building is one of the examples of remaining 1906 earthquake damage. it has been repaired above, and that is where they repaired the damage. what did they found these buildings on, back in the early days? >> those days, remember i mentioned early on, it would use of redwood grillage and they would extend the grillage up far enough so it would spread out the load. today, one would know when to evaluate a building like this, we say to ourselves, there is no way this building can be standing. the bearing pressures that are being posed on the soil far exceed the strength of the materials present, yet it works. it could be such a phenomenon as arching and other things to keep the building standing. typically, today, we would support thi
time. one tow which some people would like us to return. here's a guy himself, that's actually a light bounce off of fdr roosevelt. this was his chakra. this was march 4th, 1933. he made the statement and he made it, i didn't understand a long time. the point i was making, people were terrified. because it seemed like the economy had no bottom and the banks were going down and there was no federal deposit dollars. so imagine a time when we actually had a president who told us we should be courageous rather than trafficked in fear. to his own advantage. there's been a long war on the new deal. it was when roosevelt got started. almost immediately, the more than great realized the lengths he was willing to go. at the beginning, roosevelt didn't understand how far he was going to go. the dupont family and the ones that set up the american liberty league. that was successful because they have unlimited amounts of money. there were so popular, they were not able to stop it. they began to finance right-wing think tanks. they have been successful to the university of chicago economics departm
park. it shows roosevelt in his convertible. if you visit there, you could see he could drive using the upper part of his body. he's pointing to the plans of the hyde park. he was quite a passable architect. once he became president, he was able to build a lot more. even though henry loose was generally opposed to roosevelt. we ran a double page on his to show how the work he had done. i couldn't get it all on my standards. in the west, you would see without the new deal projects, the republican voting sun belt cities wouldn't exist. they were built at that time. so, it's as i say. there was at least a dozen agencies that left remnants. i am going to give you a primer on all of these. the premise was to put people to work. there were agencies that covered all of these. the land had been ruinned by a variety of things. this is one of the posters and these are archival photographs. this shows the ccc boys. many of them had been riding the rails. they were starving. they were illiterate. here they are in one of the camps, which were run by the army and it was like a military organizati
can use any combination. >> next, these kids are proving you're never too young to learn about farming or to get your hands a little dirty along the way, too. >> get yourself a handful. >> ah. >> and look what we have-- carrots. >> then, if you like food, there's only one place to go. so, i have traveled all over this entire show looking for one product, and i found it-- chocolate bacon. get your appetites ready, because "california country" starts now. [captioning made possible by california farm bureau federation] they're flavorful. they're colorful. and these days, you just never know where fresh california berries will turn up next. a beacon of springtime and warmer weather on the horizon, fresh california berries of every shape, size, and color are in high demand this time of year. and many of them start here along the central coast of california, where the cool coastal climate mixed with the rich soil, dedicated farmers, and skilled workers, and the perfect recipe for success is formulated. and for naturipe farmer tom amrhein, growing the little berries requires a lot of big work
so well built that in fact, they are still in use. the engineers said we have to replace a ball bearing. we of course, have neglected our infrainstruct our and it's rated to be a d and dropping. so if you don't pay your taxes, things do fall down. much of it is things that were built during the new deal. fortunately, they built them very well. so the stuff was really built to last. but, if you don't have taxes to run a state. i expect we will see more of that stuff. i will give you a brief tour that we take for granted. the commitment to public education in all its manifestations. public schools from kindergarten to higher education. there are thousand of new deal schools built within less than ten years. many have art work in or on them. this is berkeley high school. you shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free. the schools are always telling you that public education can make you better. it should be free. now, public education was fortunatate in california. just in time for them to move in. they build hundreds of schools. seismically safe schools. when you enter
, and value, those are the things that we always talk about and our company still really uses those as our cornerstone today. so, i think that's pretty amazing. >> well, there's 2 things, first of all, you got to get a family that gets along. >> ha ha ha. >> and the second thing is that we have just been dedicated to producing a quality product. and we love our work, as they say. i should be retired, but i'd probably be divorced because i'd be too much time at home. >> for "california country," i'm tracy sellers. >> brought to you by allied insurance, a member of the nationwide families of companies, which also includes nationwide insurance, on your side. >> from farm to feast, stay tuned for more of the tempting tastes of california. >> as californians, we're connected to agriculture. that's why the allied insurance partnership with the california farm bureau offers us discounts on auto insurance, whether we live on the farm or in the city. as a member of the nationwide family of companies, allied insurance is committed to protecting what's important for you and your community. contact yo
and beehives that we extract from. >> [indistinct] oh, my gosh they're right behind us. >> they're right behind us. >> what is this we're looking at? >> so, these are boxes of the honey that we keep. and they actually have a layer of, kind of like-- >> like a tray? >> like a tray that collects the honey on top of the tray. >> growing and looking after so many crops takes an army of volunteers. and many of them have had little or no farming experience. but they often see once they get their hands in the soil, well, they're hooked. >> if you can't bring the people to the land, well, you gotta bring the land to the people. and that's what we're doing here. we've got this beautiful property. and we're taking advantage of it. >> jason marks, who graduated from a farming program at u.c. santa cruz, has beeb one of the farm managers for several years. he says this project symbolizes urban farming in america. and it's a great way for people--regardless of their income-- to grow organic, healthy food. >> this is urban farming. yeah, this is how we do it. and again, you know, we're growing about 3 tons o
're very concerned about and that leads us to the levy problem in california. next. the bay delta here. and next one, please. and this was - we always talk about sea level rise and i heard a couple of orders of magnitude of estimates this morning and one of them was more like this where this is the more conservative,ip sfpuc, estimate where the change in sea level you were told sea levels are rising by about half a foot. we can expect that at least probably. but we could see an accelerated rise of maybe three or four times that according to,ip sfpuc. instead of half a foot we could see three feet. you know out here at fort point here in san francisco. first of all we don't know what the climate is doing to do, but secondly, the way ice gets dumped into the ocean from the land based - well sea level rises from one, the water gets warmer and inflates because it's density is less and that's well understood and handled by climate models. what's not well handled is the fact that when ice gets shed from green land and antarctica, there's 70 levels that if it all melted would raise sea levels
realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. >> this morning, everyone, and welcome to the 2010 s justice some of. there must be justice. i want to begin -- to the 2010 justice summit. there must be justice. i want to begin by welcoming you. i am a public defender here in san francisco, and i will be overseeing the first part of the program today. we are going to be talking about something is called ordinary in justice. if you look if the word, it says, an unjust act, and within the criminal justice system, there are a lot of fun just as if that occur. we just do not hear about them. -- a lot of unjust acts that occur. we have probably all heard there have been 150 human beings who have been exonerated after being sent to death row. that means 150 people in this country were tried and convicted and sentenced to death and then exonerated face on mostly scientific evidence. some served years. some serve a ei
in san francisco. she also began advocating to change laws. so she changed the law that used to be that in criminal trials throughout the trial you were shackled. you were actually shackled and she was one that changed that law here in san francisco and it later spread throughout the state. she was the first to call for a parole system out of the state prison, our state prisons. she was the first to change the law so that juveniles or young people were not houses with adults. -- housed with adulthoods. and we're very excited that she's here. she is actually here with us today. and she also was the first one to come up with the idea of the public defender. she is the founder of the public defender. this is 80 years before the united states supreme court decided to the gideon case where it that he would the states had to provide counsel and her name is clara shortridge fultz. and clara, are you in the house? let's give it up. [applause] >> my name is clara shortridge fultz. and they call me the lady lawyer. as a child i wanted to be a lawyer. i went to my father and told him i
should always be proud of what it is that we do for people and in fact, what they return to us. we are made better by the work that we do and may god bless all of your efforts. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, jose. the event today is also sponsored by the california attorneys for criminal justice. i also want to especially thank the rosenberg foundation and executive director tim solard who provided a grant to make this possible so thank you so much the rosenberg foundation and of course i want to thank all the volunteers who worked so hard to make this event happen today. now i'm very excited to introduce our keynote speaker. our keynote speaker is and was the first "lady lawyer" in california. it's true. because when she decided that she wanted to become a lawyer, there was one problem, the law in california didn't allow it. and so she had to change the law, which she did. she also wanted to go to law school right here at hastings college of law but they had a policy that said only men could go do that law school so she sued hastings college of the law and she changed that an
clean up the streets common so we asked out of -- miss using the law to basically clean up the streets, so we asked how many people have been arrested for intoxication, and they got back to me and said, 5000 a year. he said that is a mistake. he said, you put a 0 on the end. i called him back, and said few double check this. we were curious about what was going on in san jose, and we started to lookin into these charges, and we also started to look at other discretionary crimes, the kinds which police are the arbiters of whether or not you reach a probable cause, and we found out san jose was busting people right and left for public intoxication or resisting arrest or disturbing the peace and all sorts of crimes, and the racial disparities were off the charts when we compare them to other cities. public intoxication, there were 57% latino people being arrested. we have 3% latino people in the city. where were these 5000 people going? they were going to department 42, where the woman judge was going guilty, guilty, guilty, incontinent. we started doing a series of stories. i keep hearin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)